Community News

Giving back to the community

Main pic: Dougherty Villa’s Knit and Natter group which has been busy making blankets for the Grafton Base Hospital’s Oncology Unit. Top Inset: Jenny Vickery with some of the blankets made by Dougherty Villa’s Knit and Natter Group for the Grafton Base Hospital Oncology Unit. Bottom Inset: Dougherty Villa resident Beryl Livermore who has crocheted enough squares to make eight blankets for the Grafton Base Hospital Oncology Unit. Pics: Lynne Mowbray
Main pic: Dougherty Villa’s Knit and Natter group which has been busy making blankets for the Grafton Base Hospital’s Oncology Unit. Top Inset: Jenny Vickery with some of the blankets made by Dougherty Villa’s Knit and Natter Group for the Grafton Base Hospital Oncology Unit. Bottom Inset: Dougherty Villa resident Beryl Livermore who has crocheted enough squares to make eight blankets for the Grafton Base Hospital Oncology Unit. Pics: Lynne Mowbray

Lynne Mowbray

Over the last four months the Knit and Natter group at Dougherty Villa, aged care in Grafton have knitted and crocheted woollen squares, which have been sewn together to create 10 blankets for the Grafton Oncology Unit.
The idea for this project was planted after Mountain View resident Jenny Vickery overheard two women discussing the need for rugs to keep the Grafton Base Hospital Oncology patients, warm during their treatment.
Jenny, who had lost both her brother and sister to cancer at the ages of 56 and 59, was so moved that she decided to create a Facebook page, Warm Touch 2460.
Through this Facebook page she called for volunteers and wool; the idea quickly spread to include members of the Clarence Valley’s Waste Not Want Not group.
The group has grown to 107 members and have so far received 40 rugs, from members of the community.
Korrine Nappier and Ros Houlahan who work at the Dougherty Villa came up with the idea to get their residents involved in the project.
Ms Houlahan said that the Knit and Natter group has taken off with the help of volunteers Pat Evans, Elaine Platt and Katherine Cole who come along and have a chat with the residents as they knit and crochet.
“This has been a wonderful project – giving back to the community,” said Ms Houlahan.
“People in the community have been very generous, dropping in wool and other items for the residents.”
One of the group, Beryl Livermore (grandmother of International hockey star and Olympian Brent Livermore), has crocheted enough squares to make eight blankets, all by herself.
The next project for the Knit and Natter group is to work on Christmas boxes for Operation Christmas Child, which is sent to children in other countries who never receive a Christmas present.

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