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Clarence Valley Council will soon plant trees in the grassed area near the recently installed picnic tables and seats. Image: Geoff Helisma

Camphor laurel tree replacements revealed

Clarence Valley Council will soon plant trees in the grassed area near the recently installed picnic tables and seats. Image: Geoff Helisma

There has been substantial discussion, head-scratching and debate among various community members about whether or not Clarence Valley Council (CVC) will plant any trees in the new, flat, grassed area at the southern end of McLachlan Park in Maclean.
The council’s works and environment director, Troy Anderson, has advised the Independent that: “Council plans to plant 3 x 400 litre Eleaocarpus emundii (Smooth Leaf Quandong), 1 x 100 litre Harpullia pendulla (Australian Tulipwood) to replace the tree at entry to car park. These trees will be planted in the turfed area near the picnic tables.”
In December, the Independent reported in a story titled ‘McLachlan Park’s large trees go missing’ that it had asked, quoting the decision made by councillors in February 2016 regarding the replacement of four camphor laurel trees: “Can… people expect to see ‘super advanced trees of a suitable type [planted] on the centre line of the north-south park alignment’?”
To this question Mr Anderson replied: “Planting was targeted for November, this planting was delayed following submission of a report due to low rainfall and high temperatures, Council plans to plant 3 x 400 litre Eleaocarpus emundii (Smooth Leaf Quandong), 1 x 100 litre Harpullia pendulla (Australian Tulipwood) to replace the tree at entry to car park, 480 shrubs / groundcovers (Matt Rush; Golden Guinea Vine; Purple Coral Pea; Fairy Fan Flower) and the 300m2 turf has been planted.
“…Trees will be planted; … as per comment, plant material is held at Council’s community nursery, weather conditions required the postponement of planting.”
Last week, the Independent asked for clarification: Could you please outline exactly what the public can expect regarding the type/s of trees and where they will be planted once the weather conditions are more favourable?
Mr Anderson’s response is in the second paragraph of this story.
The Elaeocarpus Eumundi (Quandong), according to a Marrickville Council tree data sheet, has its origin in south-eastern Queensland, has a typical height of 10-12 metres, a typical width of 3-5 metres and moderate growth rate.
It is a small, native, evergreen tree with an upright, narrow form and dense, glossy canopy, with bird-attracting, scented flowers in summer, and produces dark blue, round berries.
The tulipwood, according to a Waverly Council fact sheet, is a beautiful, native, hardy, and well-behaved small tree that … is commonly used along urban coastal roads, as its toughness helps it to thrive in salty areas along ocean shores”.

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